Helping brain injury survivors understand the crisis.

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Thpandemic that is affecting the world is unprecedented. The whole of the United Kingdom has been asked by the Government to take measures to protect our own health

We have been asked to work together to protect the most vulnerable in our community to safeguard the NHS and all front-line workers

These guidelines impact significantly on daily life, familiar  activities and daily routines that  are for many people no longer possible. The information that is being shared is complex and guidance is changing daily. 

For many people living with brain injury,  the familiarity of consistent routines and community activities forms part of a daily structure that offer‘scaffolding’ to promote independence and wellbeing. The evolving news stories offering detailed information and guidance can be difficult to processFeelings of anxiety and isolation can be heightened.

The focus of occupational therapy, among other things, is to promote independence and wellbeing. As a profession, we are skilled at assisting individuals to grow, adapt and change through catastrophic life-changing illness and injury

The COVID-19 pandemic is not unique to one person; it is a challenge for us allHowever, it is important to remember that survivors of brain injury may require additional support to help them understand the impact of the virus and the actions they need to take. We hope the information below helps.

Happiness can be found even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.

J K Rowling / A Dumbledore

Shining a light on the headlines of the Covid-19 crisis 

Presenting information in a way that is easy to process helps us have a clear understanding of what we need to do to protect our own health and that of others. 

The focus of the Governments campaign has been to not touch our face, use a tissue and wash our hands. Individuals with brain injury may benefit from a prompt to do this placed above the sink with encouragement to wash their hands for 2 minutes. Make it fun by singing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice at the same time!

How can I help stop the virus

How can I help stop the virus

Do wash your hands

Do wash your hands

Remember to use a tissue

Remember to use a tissue

Don't touch your face

Don't touch your face

 

I believe it is better to do one thing really well - if you focus on doing one particular thing, you get particularly good at it. We are Occupational Therapists and only work with people with a neurological diagnosis. We understand the challenges faced by individuals with complex disability.

Jo Throp, Clinical Director

Understanding the crisis - further detailed guides

It is important to understand how Covid-19 affects us and to recognise the signs that tell us we don’t feel wellCovid-19 has some very specific symptoms and it is important that we seek help in the right way to protect ourself and others. 

If you have visits from support workers or carers, they may have to take steps to protect their own health by using personal protective equipment (PPE). There are many people working hard to help us all overcome this crisis. These information sheets will help explain it in more detail.

A guide to COVID-19

A guide to COVID-19

How can i help stop the virus?

How can i help stop the virus?

What to do if i feel unwell?

What to do if i feel unwell?

What else is stopping the virus?

What else is stopping the virus?

We work with clients who have:

  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Brain tumours
  • Post-concussion syndrome
  • Hypoxic brain damage
  • Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA)
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Spinal Cord Injuries (SCI)
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Prolonged disorders of consciousness
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP)
  • Birth related brain trauma
  • Congenital neurological conditions
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Autistic Spectrum Disorder

Social distancing, self-isolation, brain injury and me

Social distancing and self-isolation are phrases that are new to many of us. Staying in our home for long periods of time is not a normal part of our weekly routine. It can be unsettling and upsettingnot being able to do the things we enjoy

The guidance that we have all been given may mean that family members and friends can’t visit in the same way or you are unable to do the things you usually enjoy. 

Things will eventually return to normal but for the time being we all need to stick to the advice.  Take time to talk through these detailed guides with a family member or friends, using technology to keep connected with people.

Understanding social distancing

Understanding social distancing

Why is social distancing important?

Why is social distancing important?

How your neuro OT can help

How your neuro OT can help

Understanding social distancing an easy read guide

Understanding social distancing an easy read guide

A guide to self isolation

A guide to self isolation

Social distancing infographic

Social distancing infographic

Covid 19, brain injury and me - diary of an ABI survivor - part one

Covid 19, brain injury and me - diary of an ABI survivor - part one

200 activities for brain injury survivors and their families

200 activities for brain injury survivors and their families

 

Face touching tips and further resources

It seems humans can’t help unwittingly touching their faces, particularly the areas around the mouth, nose and eyes. But that puts us at particular risk of infecting ourselves with viruses, like Covid-19, and bacteria from the surfaces with which our hands come into contact. 

Brain injury survivors and those who have related cognitive or memory impairments may need extra encouragement to break face-touching habits during the coronavirus crisis. The following pages include a list of ideas to help plan your non-face touching strategy 

Six ways to help someone with a brain injury stop touching their face

Six ways to help someone with a brain injury stop touching their face

How your neurological occupational therapist can help

How your neurological occupational therapist can help

Tap into an app - Twenty apps to boost brain injury rehabilitation

Tap into an app - Twenty apps to boost brain injury rehabilitation

Yoga to manage stress following acquired brain injury

Yoga to manage stress following acquired brain injury

A universe of virtual worlds just waiting to be explored

A universe of virtual worlds just waiting to be explored

What the experts say - stress and anxiety advice for brain injury survivors during the Covid-19 pandemic

What the experts say - stress and anxiety advice for brain injury survivors during the Covid-19 pandemic

The value of reflections - how you can help yourself by taking some time to reflect

The value of reflections - how you can help yourself by taking some time to reflect

Self care - Treat yourself in the way a good, kind and supportive friend would treat you

Self care - Treat yourself in the way a good, kind and supportive friend would treat you

 

Remember, whilst you may feel anxious and isolated, you are not alone. There are many organisations who are there to help you. 

If you are concerned regarding your health, you should ring NHS 111. For social support,you should call your local social services.

What others say about us

  • I am always so impressed by the therapist’s commitment to and ongoing understanding of Claire and her situation. I am sure the rest of the family will share my thoughts so please pass on our heartfelt thanks to the therapy team when you next see them. Sister of brain injury survivor
  • I just wanted to drop you a line to say, whenever I call the office, Claire, in particular, is always very charming and efficient. She is a good representative of your company and has a nice phone manner and a good approach to customer service. So, thank you Claire. Mother of brain injury survivor
  • The following will never be enough to illustrate Paul’s journey but we are eternally grateful to the NHS, IM, ILS, Krysalis and the whole infrastructure that has been created for Paul. Yes, Paul is focused, determined and driven but the whole team have created a rehabilitation environment that has changed our life and Pauls future, they have made the thought of life and rehabilitation, turn from the impossible to the possible. Brother of brain injured survivor
  • The thought of having the family undertake this journey alone seems impossible and we will be always grateful. We all recognise that James is still on the rehabilitation journey, but there is no stopping him. He has just walked to Mum’s & Dad’s on his own (phone first to say he’s on his way)... what a way to celebrate the 2-year journey.Brother of brain injured survivor
  • I highly recommend Krysalis Consultancy OT services. Anna has been our life line since she came on board to help my husband following his brain injury. He has improved greatly thanks to Anna’s input in assisting him to become independent, teaching him step by step the simple things which we all take for granted. Anna is there for us 100%, teaching us both strategies to enable us to achieve better results.Wife of brain injured survivor
  • Just a short note to thank you very much for your hard work and persistence over the last few months, your guidance has undoubtedly helped and taken the pressure off me (I have benefited from the sessions greatly). I am really encouraged by the last few weeks and optimistic that if Peter keeps working at it he will continue to make good progress.Brother of brain injured survivor

Speak to an expert

Call today on 01722 466117